Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Prevent Osteporosis Verse

It's Never Too Late to Prevent Osteporosis

Calcium - a key element in the fight

Osteoporosis, a chronic disease that results in the deterioration of bone mineral density, affects nearly 28 million Americans -- 2 million of which are men. Despite these staggering numbers, this disease is often preventable.

Though osteoporosis has been thought of as a disease that affects mostly women, 5-6 million men are at risk of developing this disease each year and the risks increase with age. This year alone 80,000 men will suffer from hip fractures and one-third of these men will die within a year. It has also been estimated that direct and indirect costs associated with osteoporosis are $12-14 billion annually.

The leading causes of osteoporosis in men are:
Heavy use of alcohol
Steroid usage
Hypogonadism (loss of male hormone)

Additional causes of osteoporosis (in both men and women) include:
Genetics/family history
Lack of weight-bearing exercises
Inadequate calcium intake throughout life

Your Prescription Medication is Not Enough

With such alarming numbers, the National Institutes of Health and the National Osteoporosis Foundation have recommended that treatment of osteoporosis with any drug therapy also requires sufficient calcium and vitamin D to achieve optimal benefits. Studies have shown that you can triple your medication's bone-building benefits if you get the recommended 1,200 milligrams of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D daily. But, according to a recent survey, only 30 percent of women are taking calcium and vitamin D with their osteoporosis medication.

According to national studies, we are not getting enough calcium in our daily diet. While foods such as milk, broccoli, kale, beans and cheese are primary sources of calcium, large quantities of these foods would need to be eaten in order to get the right amount of calcium. A single serving of dairy provides only about 300 mg of calcium and up to 100 IU of vitamin D.

Because the average woman only gets about half the recommended daily requirement of calcium through her diet, patients who are on therapy for osteoporosis need a calcium and vitamin D supplement. "It's generally acknowledged that we don't get enough calcium through our diet, so it's a good idea for most adults, particularly those patients on osteoporosis therapy or at risk for osteoporosis, to take a calcium supplement such as Citracal + D," advises Dr. Miriam Nelson, associate professor of Nutrition and director of the Center for Physical Fitness at the School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, and author of "Strong Women, Strong Bones."

Choosing a Supplement That's Right for You

Research has determined that different types of calcium supplement formulations (carbonate, phosphate and citrate) are absorbed in different ways by the body. The most widely available over-the-counter calcium supplements are formulated primarily from calcium carbonate, which is relatively insoluble.

Though calcium carbonate usually contains the highest concentration of calcium by weight, a study published in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology shows that calcium carbonate is not readily available to the body. A study conducted by Howard J. Heller, M.D., assistant professor, Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, indicates that the tablet formulation of calcium citrate in the form of Citracal was more bioavailable than calcium carbonate in the form of Os-Cal, even when given with a meal.

Dr. Nelson explains, "Calcium citrate does not require stomach acids for absorption as does calcium carbonate. This is an added benefit for older women who do not produce much stomach acid between meals. When combining the ease of absorption when taken with or without a meal and the vital Vitamin D component by which calcium turns into bone, calcium citrate supplements such as Citracal + D are a simple way to maintain the bone mass you've built."

Here are Some Tips to Prevent Osteoporosis:
Eat calcium-rich foods, such as dairy, broccoli, kale, and beans
Moderate your intake of alcohol
Don't use steroids
If you smoke, quit
Take a daily ten-minute walk as a form of weight-bearing exercise

For more information on osteoporosis, please visit Mission Pharmacal's Web site at www.citracal.com. Citracal is manufactured and marketed by Mission Pharmacal, a leader in innovative pharmaceutical products since 1946. Based in San Antonio, Texas, the company has been dedicated to identifying unmet health needs in the marketplace and then developing innovative prescription and over-the-counter products to meet those needs for more than 50 years. Currently, Mission Pharmacal provides physicians and consumers with pharmaceutical, nutritional, diagnostic and medical device products.

Courtesy ARA Content, http://www.aracontent.com/.

Bookmark this post!

Add to Mr. Wong Add to Webnews Add to Icio Add to Oneview Add to Folkd Add to Yigg Add to Linkarena Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Simpy Add to StumbleUpon Add to Slashdot Add to Netscape Add to Furl Add to Yahoo Add to Spurl Add to Google Add to Blinklist Add to Blogmarks Add to Diigo Add to Technorati Add to Newsvine Add to Blinkbits Add to Ma.Gnolia Add to Smarking Add to Netvouz

Labels: ,

Cable vs. Satellite TV Ode

Cable vs. Satellite TV -- Which is Best?

The move is on. Last year millions of Americans switched from cable TV to satellite TV.

Why? When you compare satellite TV to cable TV you'll discover the main reasons are cost, picture quality, program choices, and customer satisfaction.

Let's check out the differences ...

Cable vs. Satellite TV Fees

Cable TV fees across the country average $39.99 per month. In our area the cost for cable TV is $37.30 a month for 64 channels, plus $10.95 a month to add digital channels. Installation in one room is $39.95, plus $9.95 for each additional room.

Satellite TV fees from Dish Network are $31.99 per month for 60 channels, while DirecTV charges $41.99 per month for 115 channels. Both satellite TV providers currently offer free satellite TV equipment and free installation in up to four rooms.

Cable vs. Satellite TV Programming

Cable TV in most areas offers almost as many channels as satellite TV, and is broadcast in analog (over-the-air) format. If you want to have digital picture and sound you'll have to pay an additional fee, usually $10 to $15 a month.

Satellite TV offers more channels than cable TV (more than 250 channels), and more HDTV (high definition TV) programming. All satellite TV channels are broadcast in digital format for the highest quality picture and sound.

Cable vs. Satellite TV Equipment

With cable you only need cable boxes that connect the incoming cable line to your televisions. There is usually no charge or rental fees for cable boxes, however, If you want a digital video recorder, you'll have to pay an extra fee.

With satellite TV you need a satellite TV dish and TV receivers. Both Dish Network and DirecTV offer that equipment, plus installation, for free. Dish Network will give you a DVR (digital video recording) receiver or an HDTV receiver at no charge, while DirecTV charges $49.99 for DVR receivers and $299 for HDTV receivers.

Cable and Satellite TV Reliability and Customer Satisfaction

Cable TV outages average 3% to 5% per year. J.D. Powers and Associates ranks cable companies as good to poor in customer satisfaction.

Satellite TV outages average about 1%. J.D. Power and Associates has ranked the two satellite TV providers -- Dish Network and DirecTV -- higher in customer satisfaction than any of the cable TV companies for the last five years

The Bottom Line

If you only watch a couple of shows a week, and you live in an area where you can't get over-the-air TV and cable TV costs less than $20 per month, then cable may be your best option.

If, on the other hand, you want the biggest variety of shows, movies, sports, and news for the least amount of money ... you want to watch your all your shows in digital video and sound ... and you want the option of watching them in HD format and recording them on a DVR receiver, then satellite TV is what you're looking for.

Brian Stevens is a professional freelance writer and webmaster who has written extensively on free satellite TV systems. For more information on free satellite TV systems go to: http://www.thesatellitetvguide.com.

Bookmark this post!

Add to Mr. Wong Add to Webnews Add to Icio Add to Oneview Add to Folkd Add to Yigg Add to Linkarena Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Simpy Add to StumbleUpon Add to Slashdot Add to Netscape Add to Furl Add to Yahoo Add to Spurl Add to Google Add to Blinklist Add to Blogmarks Add to Diigo Add to Technorati Add to Newsvine Add to Blinkbits Add to Ma.Gnolia Add to Smarking Add to Netvouz

Labels: , ,